Queen's University Belfast

History and Spanish

Queen's University Belfast
In Belfast City

£9,250
+ VAT
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Important information

Typology Bachelor's degree
Location Belfast city (Northern Ireland)
Duration 4 Years
Start Different dates available
  • Bachelor's degree
  • Belfast city (Northern Ireland)
  • Duration:
    4 Years
  • Start:
    Different dates available
Description

Overview The study of History at Queen‘s spans the period from early Greece and the later Roman Empire to the early Middle Ages and up to the 20th century. Students are encouraged to select from a wide range of modules, in geographical as well as chronological terms, with modules on Continental Europe, Africa, Asia and North America, and on European expansion overseas, as well as on Ireland and Great Britain. Within these areas, there are modules dealing with political developments, religious and economic change, and with social and cultural history, including modules in gender and women‘s history. Why Queen's?Top ranking: History at Queen's University has been placed in the QS World University Rankings top 150 History departments in the world in 2014. Research-led teaching: the 2014 Research Excellence Framework (REF) confirmed that History at Queen's is producing world-leading or internationally excellent research, placing Queen's in the top 10 of UK history departments. The School hosts many research seminars, conferences and lectures, including the annual highlight of the Wiles lecture series. Placements: internships have been developed to allow students the opportunity to carry out work experience in history-related fields.   Share this course Share

Facilities (1)
Where and when

Location

Starts

Belfast City (County Antrim)
See map
University Road, BT7 1NN

Starts

Different dates availableNow taking bookings

To take into account

· Requirements

Entry Requirements   Selection Criteria In addition to the entrance requirements below, it is essential that you read the How We Choose Our Students pdf prior to submitting your UCAS application. Entrance Requirements A-level: ABB including A-level Spanish. Note: Beginners and Post-AS Spanish pathways are also available (see subject requirements for Spanish). Irish Leaving Certificate: H3H3H3H3H3H3/H2H3H3H3H3 including Higher Level grade H3 in Spanish All applicants: there are no specific subject requirements to study History. However, if...

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What you'll learn on the course

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Course programme

Course Content (including module information)

Level 1

Modules at Level 1 offer a systematic introduction to the discipline of History, partly by sampling some of the many different approaches that historians take in studying the past, and partly by an exploration of some of the major questions of theory and method with which they are concerned.

Level 2

Modules at Level 2 are generally survey modules seeking to convey a sense of the principal events, trends and developments in a particular country or region over a fairly long time span. Examples include:

  • Greece and Macedon 404-337 BC
  • Politics and Society in 20th-Century Ireland
  • The American South 1865-1980
  • The Expansion of Medieval Europe 1000-1300

Level 3

Taught modules at Level 3 are more specialised, offering the opportunity to study a short period or a particular theme or problem in detail, working from documents as well as secondary sources. Examples include:

  • Family, Gender and Household in Ireland c1740-1840
  • Popular Culture in England 1500-1700
  • The American Civil War and Reconstruction
  • The Peasants' Revolt 1381

In addition, Single and (if they choose) Joint Honours students at Level 3 complete a double-module dissertation based on an individually-assigned research topic chosen in consultation with a supervisor.

Some modules, especially surveys, use lectures and tutorials; others are taught through seminars, in which students are expected to come prepared to fully engage in and sometimes lead group discussions. There is also increasing use of web-based learning.

A variety of assessment methods is used, including written examination, coursework essays submitted during or at the end of the semester, oral presentations by individual students or collaborative groups, and dissertations.

Assessment & Feedback

Assessment (general): The way in which students are assessed will vary according to the Learning objectives of each module. Some modules are assessed solely through project work or written assignments. Others are assessed through a combination of coursework and end of semester examinations. Details of how each module is assessed are shown in the Student Handbook which is provided to all students during their first year induction.

Feedback (general): As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and your peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

  • Feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that students, as individuals or as part of a group, have submitted.
  • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when students make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help address a specific query.
  • Placement employer comments or references.
  • Online or emailed comment.
  • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
  • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which students can review in their own time.
  • Feedback and outcomes from practical classes.
  • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.

Once students have reviewed their feedback, they are encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of their work.

Learning and Teaching

At Queen’s, we aim to deliver a high-quality learning environment that embeds intellectual curiosity, innovation and best practice in learning, teaching and student support, to enable you to achieve your full academic potential.

On the BA in History and Spanish we do this by providing a range of learning experiences which enable our students to engage with subject experts, develop attributes and perspectives that will equip them for life and work in a global society and make use of innovative technologies and a world class library that enhances their development as independent, lifelong learners. Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course:

  • Lectures: introduce basic information about new topics and outline theoretical and methodological concepts as a starting point for further study. Lectures may also provide opportunities to ask questions, and receive advice on assessments.
  • Seminars/tutorials: Significant amounts of teaching are carried out in small groups (rarely more than 15 students). The majority of seminars and tutorials are taught by permanent members of the academic staff. Such small-group teaching provides opportunities for students to engage with active researchers who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of peers. Students should also expect to make presentations and other contributions to these groups.
  • Language classes: Almost all of the teaching in Modern Languages is carried out in small groups (typically 10-20 students) in English and Spanish. Written language classes meet for two hours each week, and involve intensive work on developing linguistic competence, vocabulary, idiom, knowledge of grammar, comprehension and translation skills, essay-writing skills etc. Students should expect to prepare work in advance of each of these classes, where they will receive regular written and oral feedback on their work.
  • Oral classes: Students will have opportunities to develop oral skills and apply grammar and vocabulary in real-life, practical contexts. All these classes are taught in very small groups (typically 6-12 students) and are facilitated by native speakers.
  • Year Abroad: This is a significant learning and employability enhancement opportunity during which students can study at university, work as an English-Language Teacher, or undertake a paid work placement etc. This feature of our degree programme gives students the opportunity for personal and professional development, further develops communication and language skills, and the experience of living abroad is important for developing intercultural awareness.
  • E-Learning technologies:Most information associated with lectures and assignments is communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called Queen’s Online. A range of e-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree through, for example: computer-based grammar learning packages in the Language Centre; interactive web-based learning activities; opportunities to use IT programmes in project- based work, interactive group workshops, online discussions, and web-based learning activities.
  • Self-directed study: This is an important part of life as a Queen’s student, when private reading, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date, and research and preparation work for assignments is carried out. Academic staff will provide tailored bibliographies for research projects and self-directed reading.
  • Work-Related learning/Field Trips: Students have a variety of opportunities to participate in work-related learning and field trips; there are also meetings with alumni to advise students on opportunities for graduate employment.
  • Supervised projects and dissertations: In final year, students have the opportunity to undertake these. If they do so, they receive support from a supervisor who guides them in terms of how to carry out research and who will provide feedback on drafts of work. All supervision is undertaken by permanent members of staff, many of whom are world-class experts in their field.
  • Personal Tutor: Every undergraduate has a Personal Tutor who is a member of the academic staff. The Personal Tutor meets with his/her students throughout their academic career and provides advice on personal development, employment opportunities, and their general progress through university.

Additional information

Career Prospects Studying for a History and Spanish degree at Queen’s will assist you in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions.  Graduates from this degree at Queen’s are well regarded by many employers (local, national and international) and over half of all graduate jobs are now open to graduates of any discipline, including History.   Although many of our graduates are interested in pursuing careers in teaching, significant numbers...

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