Queen's University Belfast

International Studies and Irish

Queen's University Belfast
In Belfast City

£9,250
+ VAT
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Important information

Typology Bachelor's degree
Location Belfast city (Northern Ireland)
Duration 3 Years
Start Different dates available
  • Bachelor's degree
  • Belfast city (Northern Ireland)
  • Duration:
    3 Years
  • Start:
    Different dates available
Description

Overview How can we better understand 'power' in an age of global terrorism, unprecedented economic shifts, humanitarian crises and environmental catastrophes? Many of the most important political issues and debates confronting us today are located in the international arena, and the last decade has been a particularly turbulent time, giving rise to many headlines on issues such as global terrorism, political revolutions, the aftermath of wars in Afghanistan and Iraq, as well as Western decisions over intervention in Libya and Syria. The International Politics and Conflict Studies degree at Queen's is about more than just armed conflict and insurgency. It also examines such trends as globalisation (and considers the challenge from the rise of China and India and the impact of the American mortgage markets on the political economy of Western Europe), humanitarian issues (such as poverty, development and refugees) and the role of the media in conflict. Why Queen's?Centre of Excellence: the School of Politics, International Studies and Philosophy at Queen's has 33 full-time academics, making it the largest institutional centre for the study of these subjects in Ireland and one of the largest in the UK. Placement: work placements can be gained within a wide range of high-level organisations. Study Abroad: all students within this degree programme will have the possibility of opting to study for a semester abroad in their third year at an English-speaking university in mainland Europe. There is also a possibility for some to spend an additional year in the United States under the Study USA programme. Share this course Share

Facilities (1)
Where and when

Location

Starts

Belfast City (County Antrim)
See map
University Road, BT7 1NN

Starts

Different dates availableNow taking bookings

To take into account

· Requirements

Entry Requirements   Selection Criteria In addition to the entrance requirements below, it is essential that you read the How We Choose Our Students pdf prior to submitting your UCAS application. Entrance Requirements A-level: ABB Irish Leaving Certificate: H3H3H3H3H3H3/H2H3H3H3H3 including Higher Level grade H3 in Irish All applicants: if you plan to study International Studies as a Joint Honours degree you should refer to the subject requirements for the other course.  International Students For information on international...

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What you'll learn on the course

International
Politics
Irish
Conflict
Teaching
Global
Quality Training
Grammar
Quality
English
Media
University

Course programme

Course Content (including module information)

Year 1

Students are introduced to the study of politics, and politics and the media, the state of world politics, international history and contemporary Europe.

Year 2

In their second year, students focus on the political, economic and social transformations of the 20th century and beyond, and will be able to advance their conceptual understanding of the field of international relations and conflict by studying modules such as:

  • American Politics
  • Deeply Divided Societies
  • International Organisations
  • International Relations
  • Security and Terrorism

Year 3

In the final year, students can select more specific areas and specialist-based modules on, for example, the Middle East, Southern Africa, the European Union, and modules on identity politics, international ethics, war and visual culture, conflict and conflict resolution.

Assessment & Feedback

Assessment (general): The way in which students are assessed will vary according to the Learning objectives of each module. Some modules are assessed solely through project work or written assignments. Others are assessed through a combination of coursework and end of semester examinations. Details of how each module is assessed are shown in the Student Handbook which is provided to all students during their first year induction.

Feedback (general): As students progress through their course at Queen’s they will receive general and specific feedback about their work from a variety of sources including lecturers, module co-ordinators, placement supervisors, personal tutors, advisers of study and your peers. University students are expected to engage with reflective practice and to use this approach to improve the quality of their work. Feedback may be provided in a variety of forms including:

  • Feedback provided via formal written comments and marks relating to work that students, as individuals or as part of a group, have submitted.
  • Face to face comment. This may include occasions when students make use of the lecturers’ advertised “office hours” to help address a specific query.
  • Placement employer comments or references.
  • Online or emailed comment.
  • General comments or question and answer opportunities at the end of a lecture, seminar or tutorial.
  • Pre-submission advice regarding the standards you should aim for and common pitfalls to avoid. In some instances, this may be provided in the form of model answers or exemplars which students can review in their own time.
  • Feedback and outcomes from practical classes.
  • Comment and guidance provided by staff from specialist support services such as, Careers, Employability and Skills or the Learning Development Service.

Once students have reviewed their feedback, they are encouraged to identify and implement further improvements to the quality of their work.

Learning and Teaching

At Queen’s, we aim to deliver a high quality learning environment that embeds intellectual curiosity, innovation and best practice in learning, teaching and student support to enable student to achieve their full academic potential.

On the BA in International Studies and Irish we do this by providing a range of learning experiences which enable our students to engage with subject experts, develop attributes and perspectives that will equip them for life and work in a global society and make use of innovative technologies and a world class library that enhances their development as independent, lifelong learners. Examples of the opportunities provided for learning on this course are:

  • Lectures: introduce basic information about new topics as a starting point for further self-directed private study/reading. Lectures also provide opportunities to ask questions, gain some feedback and advice on assessments (normally delivered in large groups to all year group peers).
  • E-Learning technologies: Information associated with lectures and assignments is often communicated via a Virtual Learning Environment (VLE) called Queen’s Online. A range of e-learning experiences are also embedded in the degree through, for example: interactive group workshops in a flexible learning space; computer-based grammar learning packages in the Language Centre;IT and statistics modules; podcasts and interactive web-based learning activities; opportunities to use IT programmes associated with design in practicals and project- based work etc.
  • Seminars/tutorials: Significant amounts of teaching are carried out in small groups (typically 10-20 students). These provide an opportunity for students to engage with academic staff who have specialist knowledge of the topic, to ask questions of them and to assess their own progress and understanding with the support of peers. Students should also expect to make presentations and other contributions to these groups.
  • Language classes: Almost all of the teaching in Modern Languages is carried out in small groups (typically 10-20 students) in English and Irish. Written language classes meet for two hours each week, and involve intensive work on developing linguistic competence, vocabulary, idiom, knowledge of grammar, comprehension and translation skills, essay-writing skills etc. Students should expect to prepare work in advance of each of these classes, where they will receive regular written and oral feedback on their work.
  • Oral classes: Students have opportunities to develop oral skills and apply grammar and vocabulary in real-life, practical contexts. All these classes are taught in very small groups (typically 6-12 students) and are facilitated by native speakers.
  • Residence Course: Students taking the BA in Irish and International Studies spend a total of six weeks at the beginning of levels 2 and 3 on a residence course in Rinn na Feirste in the Donegal Gaeltacht. Here students engage with the spoken language in its native environment while staying in accommodation with a host family. Intensive, structured tuition is provided by qualified native Irish speakers during the course. In addition to the benefits for oral competence in Irish, the residence course provides a unique opportunity for immersion in Gaeltacht culture and establishes a tremendous esprit de corps among students.
  • Self-directed study: This is an essential part of life as a Queen’s student when important private reading, engagement with e-learning resources, reflection on feedback to date and assignment research and preparation work is carried out.
  • Dissertation: In final year, students may undertake a significant piece of research on a topic or practical methodology that they have chosen. Students will receive support from a supervisor who will guide them in terms of how to carry out research and who will provide feedback on at least 4 occasions during the write up stage.
  • Personal Tutor: Undergraduates are allocated a Personal Tutor during Level 1 and 2 who meets with them on several occasions during the year to support their academic development.

Additional information

Career Prospects Studying for a degree in International Studies and Irish at Queen’s will assist students in developing the core skills and employment-related experiences that are valued by employers, professional organisations and academic institutions.  Graduates from this degree have the proven ability to analyse subjects in depth and develop coherent arguments in written and verbal form, as well as linguistic fluency and intercultural awareness, all of which are highly sought after skills in a global job market. In addition, the subject-matter...

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